Whose vs. Who's: How to Use Them Correctly in Sentences – INK Blog (2022)

Whose vs. who’s: which word is right for your sentence? One is a pronoun, and the other is a contraction. Here, we’ll show you how to remember the difference between these two homophones. Also, you’ll see plenty of examples so you never doubt when to use which.

Main Whose vs. Who’s Takeaways:

  • Whoseand who’s are homophones but they are not interchangeable.
  • Whose vs. who’s are both correct but have different functions.
  • The easiest way to know if you’re using the correct word is to replace the word with who is/who has/who was. If the sentence still makes sense, then who’s is correct. If not, then whose is probably correct.
  • On one hand, whose describes possession.
  • Use whose when referencing ownership.
  • On the other hand, who’s is a contraction of who is or who has.
  • Use who’s to replace who is or who has in casual conversations where contractions are appropriate.

Whose bike is this?

Who’s coming to the park with us later?

Whose vs. Who's: How to Use Them Correctly in Sentences – INK Blog (1)

Whose vs. Who’s

When we see an apostrophe followed by the letter ‘s,’ we tend to associate this with ownership. And, most of the time, this rule holds true. However, almost every rule in the English language has an exception, and this one is no different.

For example, when it comes to it’s vs. its and whose vs. who’s, the word with the apostrophe ‘s’ is not the possessive one. Rather, it’s a contraction.

Whose and who’s are homophones, meaning these words sound the same. However, they have different spellings, meanings, and functions. On one hand, who’s is a contraction that links the pronoun who with the verb is or has. Like other contractions, it’s appropriate for casual conversations, but should be spelled out in formal writing.

Conversely, whose is a possessive pronoun, which expresses “to whom something belongs.” It often describes a person, but you can also use it for a pet or location.

  • Whose definition:(pronoun) a question word used to determine which entity is responsible for an item
  • Who’s definition:(contraction) who is; who was; who has

Who’s on third?

Who is on third?

Whose on third?

Whose is often a replacement for whoor whom. But, watch out; you may need to rephrase your sentence. You can’t necessarily swap the words.

Whose shoes are those?

Who owns those shoes?

To whom do those shoes belong?

Who’s shoes are those?

How to Remember the Difference Between Whose vs. Who’s

Here’s the easiest way to remember the difference between whose vs. who’s. Since who’s is a contraction for the phrases who is and who has, try replacing the word with who is or who has.

If the sentence still makes sense and is it still grammatically correct, then choose the contraction who’s (with the apostrophe ‘s’). Otherwise, whose (without the apostrophe ‘s’) is probably the word you want.

Who’s planning on staying for dinner?

Whose planning on staying for dinner?

Who is planning on staying for dinner?

Whose car is blocking the entrance?

Who is car is blocking the entrance?

Whose car is blocking the entrance?

Whose refers to possession, while who’s is a contraction that means who is or who has.

Whose vs. Who's: How to Use Them Correctly in Sentences – INK Blog (2)

Who is Contraction in Grammar?

In English grammar, who’s (with the apostrophe ‘s’) is the contraction for who is, not the possessive pronoun whose (without the apostrophe ‘s’). Other examples of contractions, or shortened words made by combining multiple words, include don’t (do not), can’t (can not), you’ve (you have), and I’ll (I will).

Use the contraction who’s in casual speaking and writing. For more formal situations, it’s always best to spell out the contraction.

Who is the tall woman in the long coat?

Who’s the tall woman in the long coat?

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My nephew, who has just left for the store, will be back in about an hour.

My nephew, who’s just left for the store, will be back in about an hour.

Whose vs. Who’s Sentences

Here’s how to use whose vs. who’s in a sentence:

Whosecar were you in?

Who’sknocking on my door?

Idon’t know whose keys these are, so I can’t return it.

Who’sstolen my keys?

Whosepresentation did you watch?

I don’t knowwho’sdoing that.

The receptionist asked whose coat was on the couch but none of the guests answered.

Mike, who’s invited me to hissister’s housefor dinner, is a fantastic cook.

She rode home inwhose car?

Whosechild has a fever?

An apostrophe and an ‘s’ usually indicate ownership or possession. However, who’s breaks this rule. It’s a contraction, not a possessive word.

Who’s or Whose Birthday?

The correct answer is: whose birthday. Why? Because whose is a possessive pronoun while who’s is a contraction of the phrases who is and who has. Therefore, the question is really: who does the birthday belong to?

Since this is a question about possession, we know that the possessive pronoun whoseis correct. Confirm this by replacing the word with who is (Who is birthday?). Since the sentence doesn’t make sense, we’re confident that whose is correct.

Who is birthday is it?

Whose birthday is it?

Whose Name or Who’s Name?

The correct way to phrase this is: whose name, notwho’s name. The real question is about who the name belongs to. In other words, this phrase is about possession. Since whose is a possessive pronoun, it makes more sense than who’s, which is the contraction for the phrases who is and who has.

You can easily check if whose is the correct answer by replacing the word with who is. Does the sentence still make sense? If so, then the contraction who’s is the correct word. If not, then the possessive pronoun whose is correct.

Whose name did the teacher call?

Who is name did the teacher call?

Whose name did the teacher call?

Whose vs. Who's: How to Use Them Correctly in Sentences – INK Blog (3)

Who’s Idea of Whose Idea?

Here, the correct phrasing is whose idea, not who’s idea. The question is actually “to whom does this idea belong” or “who came up with this idea?” As a result, the phrase is about finding out who possesses the idea. Therefore, we need a possessive pronoun like whose instead of a contraction like who is.

You can check that whose is the correct answer by replacing the word with the phrase who is. If the sentence doesn’t make sense, then whose is correct. If the sentence does make sense, then who’s is correct.

Whose idea was it to go hiking in the pouring rain?

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Whois idea was it to go hiking in the pouring rain?

Whose idea was it to go hiking in the pouring rain?

Whose Fault or Who’s Fault?

Whether whose fault or who’s fault is correct depends on what you are trying to say. For example, if you are trying to understand which person the blame belongs to, then whose fault would be the correct way to phrase this. That is because whoseis a possessive pronoun, meaning we use it to show possession or ownership.

However, if there is a person named Fault and you are trying to understand who this person is, then who’s fault would be correct. This is because the who’s is a contraction of who is.

Whosefault it is, then?

Who is fault it is, then?

Whose fault it is, then?

Who’s this guy Fault I keep hearing about?

Who is this guy Fault I keep hearing about?

Whose this guy Fault I keep hearing about?

Who’s Phone or Whose Phone?

Whose phone is correct, not who’s phone. Because the phrase is about the person who owns or possesses the phone, we need a possessive pronoun.

One way to confirm that whose is correct is to replace the word with the phrase who is. If the sentence still make sense, then you need who’s, or the contraction of who is. However, if the sentence doesn’t make sense, then you need to use whose.

Whose phone is this on the table?

Who is phone is this on the table?

Whose phone is this on the table?

Who’s Son or Whose Son?

In this example, the correct phrasing is whose son, not who’s son. The reason is that the sentence refers to whom the son belongs. In other words, the sentence is about possession or ownership. So, we need to use a possessive pronoun.

Since whose is a possessive pronoun, it’s the correct choice. This is confusing because using an apostrophe + ‘s’ usually indicates possession. However, who’s is a contraction of who is, and not a possessive pronoun. As a result, you can check that whose is correct by replacing the word with who is. Since the sentence no longer makes sense, you know that who’s is incorrect.

Whose son built the solar-powered robot at the Science Fair?

Whois son built the solar-powered robot at the Science Fair?

Whose son built the solar-powered robot at the Science Fair?

More Whose and Who’s Sentence Examples

Here are examples of how to use whose vs. who’s in a sentence:

Whosefiles are those, andwho’sworking on them today?

Who’swonderingwhosefiles those are?

Whosedog biscuits are those?

Who’shungry for tacos?

Missourians often take a quick trip to St. Louis, a citywhosecentral location makes it a prime spot for staycations.

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I don’t knowwho’smisplaced these files.

Stella bought treats for Stanley, a catwhosefavorite snack is made from bacon.

My boss told mewho’sattending the meeting.

Who’sgoing to the beach?

Whose vs. who’s are homophones. That means the two words sound alike in speech but are spelled differently. Other examples of homophones include:

  • wether, weather, and wether
  • to, too, and two
  • a lot and allot

Ready for a Quick Whose vs. Who’s Quiz?

Whose vs. Who's: How to Use Them Correctly in Sentences – INK Blog (4)

Correct!Wrong!

The answer is FALSE. “Whose” describes possession, while “who's” is a contraction for "who is" or "who has."

Whose Question #2

Whose vs. Who's: How to Use Them Correctly in Sentences – INK Blog (5)

Correct!Wrong!

The answer is C. As a possessive pronoun, “whose” indicates that something belongs to someone.

Who's Question #3

Whose vs. Who's: How to Use Them Correctly in Sentences – INK Blog (6)

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Correct!Wrong!

The answer is A. “Who's” is a contraction of “who is.”

Whose and Who's Question #4

Whose vs. Who's: How to Use Them Correctly in Sentences – INK Blog (7)

Correct!Wrong!

The answer is TRUE. Although both words sound alike, they are spelled differently.

Whose vs Who's Question #5

Whose vs. Who's: How to Use Them Correctly in Sentences – INK Blog (8)

Correct!Wrong!

The answer is WHOSE. Whose is used to describe an entity that owns or possesses an item.

Whose or Who's Question #6

Whose vs. Who's: How to Use Them Correctly in Sentences – INK Blog (9)

Correct!Wrong!

The answer is WHO'S. You can swap “who's” for “who is” in the sentence.

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FAQs

Whose or who's in a sentence? ›

. Whose is a possessive adjective meaning "of or relating to whom" ("Whose shoes are these?") If you mistakenly assume the 's on who's is for possession you'll use who's incorrectly. Just remember that possessive adjectives like my, your, his, her, and its do not have 's, and neither does whose.

How do I correctly use Who whom and whose in my writing? ›

'Who' is a subject pronoun. It is used to specify which person did an action or which person is in a certain state. 'Whom' is an object pronoun that is used to indicate the person who received an action. 'Whose' is a possessive pronoun that is used to refer to which person something belongs to.

How do you use Whos in a sentence? ›

The old guy who's always taking pictures. He and his wife, who's as nutty as Planters, aren't on anyone's top one hundred list of the rich and famous. There's a young girl who's been staying with us. All you need to do is tell me where you do your fishing and who's in the boat.

What the difference between whose and who's? ›

Just remember: whose means "belonging to a person" and who's means "who is." I hope this helps.

Whose room or who's room? ›

If you're looking at your writing and can't decide whether to use whose or who's, read the sentence out loud and replace the word in question with "who is" and "who has." If it makes sense with one of those, you'll use who's. If it doesn't make sense, use whose.

Whose phone or who's phone? ›

Who's Phone or Whose Phone? Whose phone is correct, not who's phone. Because the phrase is about the person who owns or possesses the phone, we need a possessive pronoun.

Who vs whom examples sentences? ›

“Who,” the subjective pronoun, is the doer of an action. For example, “That's the girl who scored the goal.” It is the subject of “scored” because the girl was doing the scoring. Then, “whom,” as the objective pronoun, receives the action. For instance, “Whom do you like best?” It is the object of “like”.

When should we use who or whom? ›

The Rule: Who functions as a subject, while whom functions as an object. Use who when the word is performing the action. Use whom when it is receiving the action. Kim is an athlete who enjoys distance running.

Who vs whom in questions? ›

If the preposition is at the end of the question, informal English uses “who” instead of “whom.” (As seen in “Who will I speak with” above.) However, if the question begins with a preposition, you will need to use “whom,” whether the sentence is formal or informal. (As in “With whom will I speak?”)

Who's wife or whose wife? ›

Mixing up "whose" and "who's" is a common grammar mistake. People tend to believe any word with a contraction, such as "who's," is possessive. But in fact, "whose" is the possessive form, while "who's" is a contraction for "who is" or "who has."

Can you use Whose for a thing? ›

Whose is the possessive form of the relative pronoun who.

Whose attention or who's attention? ›

One way to figure out whether you should use “who's” or “whose” is to say “who is” out loud to yourself as you read or write. If that makes sense in the sentence, you should use who's. If it doesn't, you should use whose.

Whose birthday or who's birthday? ›

Senior Member. "Who's" is a contraction of "who is" or "who has". "Whose" is the possessive form of "who".

Whose focus or who's focus? ›

The word “whose” can be complex, so focus on testing to see if “who's” is the correct word you are looking for. Plug “who is” or “who has” into a sentence. If it makes sentence, then “who's” is the correct word. If it doesn't make sense, use “whose.”

Who's Party or whose party? ›

Who's is a contraction for who is or who has. Whose is used to show possession. Whose as a possessive is often confusing because possessives usually use an apostrophe + s (Mike's shoes, Cindy's dress, Brad's party). But, in the case of whose, there is no apostrophe.

What is another word for whose? ›

Synonyms: to whom, to who, of whom, of which the, belonging to what person, more...

How do you say the word whose? ›

Confused Words: WHO'S & WHOSE - YouTube

Whose problem or who's problem? ›

If you forget, remember that who's is often a question — it has a little space waiting for an answer. That apostrophe stands for "is." Whose owns it all. It's possessive, like a kid who keeps all the toys close. The bottom line is that who's is short for "who is," and whose shows ownership.

Who's ready or whose ready? ›

For example, when you want to say, “Whose turn is it?” use whose, because otherwise you're saying, “Who is turn is it?” and that just sounds silly. But if you're saying, “Who's ready for spring?” what you're saying is “Who is ready for spring”; therefore, “who's” is correct. So easy!

Whose fault or who's fault? ›

"Who's Fault?" is okay if Fault is a name. "Who is fault" is incorrect, which helps in checking whether you need "whose" or "who's". If you expand "who's" to "who is" you see at once that an incorrect sentence is formed. So, it' can't be "who's."

Who am I chatting with or whom am I chatting with? ›

“Who am I speaking to” and “whom am I speaking to” are both correct. “Whom” is more formal, as it sticks to the original language rules that relate to using an object pronoun. “Who am I speaking to” sounds more natural, and many native speakers prefer it.

Is it who or whom plural? ›

'Who' does not inflect for number: it is always 'who' as the subject of a clause and 'whom' in all other contexts, whether its antecedent is singular or plural.

WHO cancels Who or whom? ›

How to use who and whom correctly? The answer is simple: If you can replace the word with “he” or “she” then you should use who. However, if you can replace it with “him” or “her,” use whom.

Who or whom exercises? ›

Choose the correct answer (who or whom?)
  • To. who. whom. have you offered the flowers?
  • Who. Whom. wrote that beautiful love poem?
  • I just want to know. who. whom. made this delicious dish.
  • Do you know the man. who. whom. ...
  • My parents will accept. whoever. whomever. ...
  • For. who. whom. ...
  • He is a kind of person for. who. whom. ...
  • Tell me, who. whom.

What is another word for whom? ›

Synonyms: who, he who, she who, the one who, the person who, more...

Who should I ask or whom should I ask? ›

The rule goes we should use 'who' to ask about the subject, and 'whom' to ask about the object.

How do you use WHO in question? ›

We use who and whom on their own:
  1. Who paid?
  2. Whom did you speak to?
  3. Who is the best footballer in the world? ( who as subject)
  4. Who did you meet? ( who as object)
  5. What happened next? ( what as subject)
  6. What did you buy? ( what as object)

What are Wh questions examples with answers? ›

Wh- questions (open questions)
questionresponse
How does this work?Push the red button.
How was your mother?She was much better.
How has the weather been?It's been very rainy.
How will he win the race?By training every day.

What are Wh questions examples? ›

WH-questions are questions starting with WH-words including: what, when, where, who, whom, which, whose, why and how.
...
WH- questions (Question Words)
Question wordsUsagesExamples
HowUsed to ask about manner/ process- How can you explain this problem? Please tell us. - How can you get here?
8 more rows

Who's mom or whose mom? ›

If you're debating which one to use, substitute “who is” or “who has” in place of who's/whose. If the sentence retains its meaning, the “who's” is the correct form. If the sentence loses its meaning, then “whose” is the correct form.

Whose is this bag or whose bag is this? ›

They are the same and both are correct. But "whose is this bag" sounds unnatural. We mostly say "whose bag is this"

Can whose be plural? ›

The word "whose" can be used with both singular and plural nouns, and its form doesn't change.

What are the 7 WH questions? ›

Wh-questions begin with what, when, where, who, whom, which, whose, why and how. We use them to ask for information.

What are the 7 question words? ›

There are seven question words in English: who, what, where, when, why, which, and how. Question words are a basic part of English and important to know. Plus (also), it is easy to see what a question word is because it is always at the beginning of a sentence.

How do you write a WH question examples? ›

How to form Wh-Questions? | English Grammar | Home Revise - YouTube

Can I use Whose for non person? ›

Those who object to this use of of which the find it clunky or overly formal. The inanimate whose is restricted to the relative pronoun; English speakers do not use whose as a non-personal interrogative possessive: the whose in "Whose car is this?" can refer only to a person.

Can whose refer to multiple people? ›

To summarize, when the word "whose" is used as an interrogative pronoun, it can only refer to a person; however, when it is used as a relative pronoun, the word "whose" can indeed refer to things and objects.

What to use instead of Whose for things? ›

Related
  • Pronoun question: referring to inanimate objects as 'he' or 'she'
  • "Which" instead of "whose" for inanimate objects.

What does who's who mean? ›

Definition of who's who

1 : a compilation of brief biographical sketches of prominent persons in a particular field a who's who of sports figures. 2 : the leaders of a group : elite. 3 : a listing or grouping of notable persons or things.

Who has or who have? ›

If ( who ) is used for one person, ( has ) is used. If ( who ) is used for more than one person, (have ) is used. So, both ( who has ) or ( who have ) are correct.

Who is thiss? ›

"Who's this?" is a phrase you text to sketchy numbers that text you first claiming that they know you. It may be the cause of a blackout the night before, or sketchy ...

Whose name or who's name? ›

Whose is the possessive form of the pronoun who, while who's is a contraction of the words who is or who has. However, many people still find whose and who's particularly confusing because, in English, an apostrophe followed by an s usually indicates the possessive form of a word.

Whose is this book or whose book is this? ›

possessive pronouns (mine, theirs)a2
Whose book is this? (singular)Whose books are these? (plural)
Possessive adjectivePossessive pronounPossessive pronoun
It's your book.It's yours.They're yours.
It's his book.It's his.They're
It's her book.It's hers.They're hers.
4 more rows

Whose teacher or who's teacher? ›

Look at the noun that follows the term. If there is no article like a, an, or the, use whose. Also, whose must be followed by a noun. So if there is no noun, use who's.

What is the difference between its and it's? ›

Its (without an apostrophe) is the possessive of the pronoun “it”. You will also come across “it's” (with an apostrophe). This is a contraction of “it is” or “it has”. Because they are pronounced the same but have different meanings, we call these words homophones.

Is it effect or affect? ›

Generally, we use affect as a verb (an action word) and effect as a noun (an object word).

Who's wife or whose wife? ›

Mixing up "whose" and "who's" is a common grammar mistake. People tend to believe any word with a contraction, such as "who's," is possessive. But in fact, "whose" is the possessive form, while "who's" is a contraction for "who is" or "who has."

Who's house or whose house? ›

Remember, whose is possessive. That means that whose is normally followed by a noun. If the sentence has a noun immediately after the whose or who's, you should use whose. If there's no noun or an article, use who's.

Who's child or whose child? ›

If you forget, remember that who's is often a question — it has a little space waiting for an answer. That apostrophe stands for "is." Whose owns it all. It's possessive, like a kid who keeps all the toys close. The bottom line is that who's is short for "who is," and whose shows ownership.

Who's ready or whose ready? ›

For example, when you want to say, “Whose turn is it?” use whose, because otherwise you're saying, “Who is turn is it?” and that just sounds silly. But if you're saying, “Who's ready for spring?” what you're saying is “Who is ready for spring”; therefore, “who's” is correct. So easy!

Who's mom or whose mom? ›

If you're debating which one to use, substitute “who is” or “who has” in place of who's/whose. If the sentence retains its meaning, the “who's” is the correct form. If the sentence loses its meaning, then “whose” is the correct form.

Who's or whose birthday? ›

Senior Member. "Who's" is a contraction of "who is" or "who has". "Whose" is the possessive form of "who".

What is another word for whose? ›

Synonyms: to whom, to who, of whom, of which the, belonging to what person, more...

Who's Party or whose party? ›

Who's is a contraction for who is or who has. Whose is used to show possession. Whose as a possessive is often confusing because possessives usually use an apostrophe + s (Mike's shoes, Cindy's dress, Brad's party). But, in the case of whose, there is no apostrophe.

Can whose be used for things? ›

To summarize, when the word "whose" is used as an interrogative pronoun, it can only refer to a person; however, when it is used as a relative pronoun, the word "whose" can indeed refer to things and objects.

Can whose be plural? ›

The word "whose" can be used with both singular and plural nouns, and its form doesn't change.

Whose is this bag or whose bag is this? ›

They are the same and both are correct. But "whose is this bag" sounds unnatural. We mostly say "whose bag is this"

How do you teach Whose? ›

Tricks
  1. Say who is to yourself as you read or write the sentence. If it's not possible to say who is, write whose, not who's.
  2. Look at the noun that follows the term. If there is no article like a, an, or the, use whose. Also, whose must be followed by a noun. So if there is no noun, use who's.
29 Aug 2013

Whose fault or who's fault? ›

"Who's Fault?" is okay if Fault is a name. "Who is fault" is incorrect, which helps in checking whether you need "whose" or "who's". If you expand "who's" to "who is" you see at once that an incorrect sentence is formed. So, it' can't be "who's."

Whose name or who's name? ›

Whose is the possessive form of the pronoun who, while who's is a contraction of the words who is or who has. However, many people still find whose and who's particularly confusing because, in English, an apostrophe followed by an s usually indicates the possessive form of a word.

Whose is this book or whose book is this? ›

possessive pronouns (mine, theirs)a2
Whose book is this? (singular)Whose books are these? (plural)
Possessive adjectivePossessive pronounPossessive pronoun
It's your book.It's yours.They're yours.
It's his book.It's his.They're
It's her book.It's hers.They're hers.
4 more rows

Whose birthday is it today meaning? ›

Moderator. The first "Whose birthday is it today?" suggests, as bhaisahab said, that you already know it is someone's birthday today but you're not sure whose. There may be 30 people in the room, earlier you heard someone say that someone has a birthday day but they didn't say which person.

Whose vs. who's is the difference between showing possession and shortening the phrases 'who was' or 'who is.' See when to use whose or who's here.

It’s a contraction, not a possessive word .. Because whose is a possessive pronoun while who’s is a contraction of the phrases who is and who has .. Since this is a question about possession, we know that the possessive pronoun whose is correct.. Since whose is a possessive pronoun, it makes more sense than who’s , which is the contraction for the phrases who is and who has .. If so, then the contraction who’s is the correct word.

9 thoughts on “who’s vs. For example, when it comes to it’s vs. The correct choice is whose As a possessive pronoun, “whose” indicates that something belongs to someone. More whose and who’s sentence examples. whose grammar got a boost from this read? whose and who’s are homophones but they are not interchangeable. A building whose demolition had been in the works for years. Since the sentence doesn’t make sense, we’re confident that whose is correct. The firefighter, whose brave actions saved dozens, was presented with a medal. Although who’s is a contraction and whose is possessive, putting them together can make you sound a bit like an owl. For instance, “whose puppy is this? [ world’s strangest ] whose ass should i kick at ping-pong? Anyone (who’s, whose) had experience in graphic design can help me with my project. Both who’s and whose come from the pronoun who (shocking, right? You’re not the only one who’s–or may it’s whose–repeatedly stumped. But, when you need “whom” to explain what “whose” means, more information is needed. Because whose is a possessive pronoun while who’s is a contraction of the phrases who is and who has Chicago, a city (who’s, whose) architecture is admired all over the world, has a population of over 2 million residents. But whose time is it? (in this example, whose might sound a bit strange. whose shoes are those? Conversely, whose is a possessive pronoun, which expresses “to whom something belongs. who’s son or whose son? You can check that whose is the correct answer by replacing the word with the phrase who is I ran into mark, whose house i painted last year. Or whose shoes ? When you learn the pronoun that forms the basis for “whose” and “who’s,” you’ll also develop a better understanding of how each word functions in a sentence. You can easily check if whose is the correct answer by replacing the word with who is As a possessive pronoun, “whose” indicates that something belongs to someone. However, who’s is a contraction of who is , and not a possessive pronoun. March 5, 2013 at 4:52 pm. Since the sentence doesn’t make sense, we’re confident that whose is correct. 9 thoughts on “who’s vs. Log into your account. Both who’s and whose come from the pronoun who (shocking, right? You’re not the only one who’s–or may it’s whose–repeatedly stumped. On the other hand, who’s is a contraction of the phrase “who is (tom clancy, commander in chief , 124). Chicago, a city (who’s, whose) architecture is admired all over the world, has a population of over 2 million residents. Who’s [=who is] at the door? And, most of the time, this rule holds true. One is a pronoun, and the other is a contraction. (in this example, whose might sound a bit strange. Alternatively, “who’s shoes,” could mean “who has shoes? Imagine saying “i do not know who is going to go. who’s son or whose son? Browse the medical dictionary. ” “who” is used as the subject of a sentence or clause. It can be found at the beginning of a question. To whom are you speaking? For more information on your favorite works of literature, take a look at our collection of high-quality book guides ! Grammar transitive verbs: definition and examples grammar linking verbs: definition and examples grammar what is the present perfect tense? Who’s = contraction of who is or who has A common mistake is thinking that who’s , rather than whose , is the possessive form of who. [ warming glow ] i am convinced this really is an idea whose time has come. A who’s who regarding ‘who’s’ and ‘whose’. However, who’s breaks this rule. If yes, you want whose [ oc register ] who’s renting what on netflix? However, they have different spellings, meanings, and functions. 2022 merriam-webster, incorporated. To whom was the teacher talking? Their roles were filled by fbi agents whose identities remain unknown. ” this odd tendency arises out of the fact that there is no equivalent word in english that’s strictly for inanimate objects. The easiest way to know if you’re using the correct word is to replace the word with who is/who has / who was Its function is to ask who has or owns something. ” however, this isn’t the way we typically phrase this type of question. If the sentence loses its meaning, then “whose” is the correct form. But, watch out; you may need to rephrase your sentence. Copyright 2005 - present critic capital llc all rights reserved. Who’s stolen my keys? Click here to try one of our vocabulary quizzes before you go! Let’s tackle “me, myself and i”. Should you retake your sat or act? my boss told me who’s attending the meeting. In his high school yearbook, leslie was voted “most popular” on the yearbook’s who’s who page. Remember, whose is possessive. They’re great friends who’ve shown their loyalty time and again. How to use "whose" and "who's". In sentence 3, “whose” concerns who should get the blame for the mistake. Who’s is a contraction of who is or who has get grammarly for free works on all your favorite websites related articles grammar what are contractions in writing? “whose” describes possession, while “who's” is a contraction for "who is" or "who has Who’s is a contraction of who + is or who + has How to use a word that (literally) drives some pe. The reason is that the sentence refers to whom the son belongs. — cindylu, united states. Effect two of the easiest words in the english language to mix up, learn the difference between affect and effect, when each should be used and more. But the boy’s ball belongs to him. Who’s the tall woman in the long coat? whose is a pronoun used in questions to ask who owns something or has something. You can’t necessarily swap the words. whose name or who’s name? The roots of whose vs who’s: who and whom. Proofread like a pro. whose means “belonging to whom,” and occasionally “of which. Please enter your comment! it is the interrogative that is used for animate subjects. For instance, “who is going to the party? whose dog biscuits are those? Like other contractions, it’s appropriate for casual conversations, but should be spelled out in formal writing. Keep your apostrophes where they belong by continuing through this explanation of who’s vs. Aside from “who is,” “who’s” is also a contraction for “who was” and “who has who’s is a contraction made up of who + is or who + has Effect by riley thompson manning two of the easiest words in the english language to mix up, learn the difference between affect and effect, when each should be used and more. The word who's is a contraction of "who is". Grammarly can save you from misspellings, grammatical and punctuation mistakes, and other writing issues on all your favorite websites. Writing, grammar, and communication tips for your inbox. In addition to her work for prepscholar, hayley is the author of museum hack's guide to history's fiercest females. Let’s start by breaking it down simply. Who’s is a contraction, or a shortened and combined version of two words (who + is, or who + has). Delivered to your inbox! Browse the thesaurus. This is similar to the contractions he's for "he is" and she's for "she is. How to choose “affect” or “effect”. The short version whose is the possessive form of “who. Sat / act online prep blog. November 5, 2012 at 10:21 am. When we see an apostrophe followed by the letter ‘s,’ we tend to associate this with ownership.

Who’s is a contraction of who is or who has get grammarly for free works on all your favorite websites related articles grammar what are contractions in writing?. The word who's is a contraction of " who is ".. If the word you’re writing is a contraction, it’s “who’s.. This is because the two words are homophones: words that sound exactly the same but have different meanings.. In english grammar, who’s (with the apostrophe ‘s’) is the contraction for who is , not the possessive pronoun whose (without the apostrophe ‘s’).. For example, if you are trying to understand which person the blame belongs to, then whose fault would be the correct way to phrase this.. The correct answer is: whose birthday whose and who’s are homophones, meaning these words sound the same.. The words who’s and whose both come from the pronoun who.. If so, then the contraction who’s is the correct word.. Mike, who’s invited me to his sister’s house for dinner , is a fantastic cook Who’s is a contraction, a shortened version of “ who is ,” or “ who has The answer is who's.. Since this is a question about possession, we know that the possessive pronoun whose is correct.. In other words, for the word “it” or the word “who”, if you intend to append and contract the word “is”, then you must use an apostrophe, otherwise it would not be a contraction.. In other words, whose is about possession.. Because the phrase is about the person who owns or possesses the phone, we need a possessive pronoun.

How to remember the difference between whose vs. whose planning on staying for dinner? In sentence 1, “whose” shows stacy’s possession of her mother. whose fault or who’s fault? whose is a pronoun used in questions to ask who owns something or has something. That means that whose is normally followed by a noun. [ world’s strangest ] whose ass should i kick at ping-pong? Who’s or whose birthday? Below are some examples of whose in sentences. One way to figure out whether you should use “who’s” or “whose” is to say “who is” out loud to yourself as you read or write. If not, then whose is probably correct. Let’s take a look at some examples of when to use whose or who’s. In sentence 2, “whose” concerns the owner of the shoes left by the door. Who’s clear on who’s and whose? whose or who’s examples. whose is another way of saying “belonging to whom”. “whose” is used to describe an entity that owns or possesses an item. How to use "whose" and "who's" britannica dictionary. I ran into mark, whose house i painted last year. The most well-known demonstration of possessive whose might be in the title of the comedy show whose line is it anyway? One way to confirm that whose is correct is to replace the word with the phrase who is A who’s who regarding ‘who’s’ and ‘whose’. They live in a port city whose economy relies heavily on fishing. whose vs who’s: what’s the difference? On the other hand, we use the possessive pronoun “ whose ” if we’re asking to whom something belongs (e. whose vs who's question #1. whose idea was it to go hiking in the pouring rain? “who” is one pronoun at the root of the difference between “whose” and “who’s. ” if the word isn’t a contraction, it’s “whose. whose fault it is, then? Does the sentence still make sense? How to get a perfect 36 act, by a perfect scorer. whose fault or who’s fault? Whomever: how to always pick the right one. Count words and characters, correct spelling and grammar, and check keyword density. One way to figure out whether you should use “who’s” or “whose” is to say “who is” out loud to yourself as you read or write. If not, then whose is probably correct. Who’s on third? Each of these sentences still makes perfect sense when you replace “who’s” with “who is” or “who has Take our visual quiz. who owns those shoes? How to use a word that (literally) drives some pe. whose is another way of saying “belonging to whom”. However, almost every rule in the english language has an exception, and this one is no different. A teacher who’s [=who is] admired by everyone. This is similar to the contractions he's for "he is" and she's for "she is. How to use "whose" and "who's" britannica dictionary. Who's: how to use them correctly in sentences – ink blog. have friends who also need help with test prep? When you buy via the links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission at no cost to you. Grammar what are modifiers? get grammarly it's free “grammarly quickly and easily makes your writing better. The reason is that the sentence refers to whom the son belongs. Who’s is a contraction. ” keep in mind that we use the contraction who’s when we would otherwise be saying “ who is ” or “ who has ” (e. Subscribe to our blog today! An object pronoun is a word like “him,” “her,” or “them”. Both of these words are versions of the interrogative pronoun who. “who” is one pronoun at the root of the difference between “whose” and “who’s. whose fault it is, then? William faulkner, (who’s, whose) books i read in high school, remains one of my favorite authors. got questions about arthur miller's the crucible ? Use the contraction who’s in casual speaking and writing. An object pronoun is a type of pronoun that’s used as a grammatical object, such as object of a verb or the object of a preposition. Therefore, we need a possessive pronoun like whose instead of a contraction like who is The correct answer is “ who’s. However, if there is a person named fault and you are trying to understand who this person is, then who’s fault would be correct. The answer is false. It’s like i solved its confusion. Who’s coming to the park with us later? Who is idea was it to go hiking in the pouring rain? Just in case, let’s review. The long version is a little, well, longer. In these examples, “whom” is the object, not the subject. 2021 ink, all right reserved we help brands stay relevant and gain visibility in search results. Score 600 on sat reading. (tom clancy, commander in chief , 124). whose shoes are those? whose car alarm is going off? He is a person, it’s true he’s a person, so the ball does not belong to it; the ball’s not its ball, it’s in fact the boy’s ball — the ball’s his — it’s not its own ball, its emancipation may someday come about, but it’s not its call. For more formal situations, it’s always best to spell out the contraction. The short version whose is the possessive form of “who. The britannica dictionary. Eggcorns and mondegreens. The formula: who + is, or who + has I found a hat, but i didn’t know whose it was. The boy is tall == the boy’s tall. "who’s" is a contraction made up of either “who+is” or “who+has”. But the boy’s ball belongs to him. whose is a possessive pronoun. Hard words to spell. Here are some of the words we're currently looking at for a spot in the dictionary. whose on third? Now you’re someone who’s ready to use these pronouns in style. whose or who's question #6. Get free exclusive insider tips on how to ace the. whose line is it anyway? By using our site you agree to our privacy policy. whose sunglasses are these? It’s “it’s it” by definition. Test your knowledge ». June 10, 2015 at 1:16 pm. Writing, grammar, and communication tips for your inbox. who’s son or whose son? It rhymes with shoes. ') or "who has" ('who's got the time? Are two of the most mistakenly-used words in the writing world; even highly-educated professionals mix them up! It’s not what it looks like…it’s not what it’s like in its appearance. Wether, weather, and wether to, too, and two a lot and allot. On one hand, who’s is a contraction that links the pronoun who with the verb is or has. Just remember: whose means "belonging to a person" and who's means "who is ” normally, possession is shown by an apostrophe “s,” but not with this form. Roll up your sleeves and identify these garments. What helps me is to remove the contraction if you’re going to use who’s and ask yourself if it makes sense. Consequently, their roles had to be filled by cia officers whose identities had not been revealed to the russians. Get the latest articles and test prep tips! ” is another way of saying, “to whom does this puppy belong? Aug 16, 2021 at 2:27 am gmt. That is because whose is a possessive pronoun, meaning we use it to show possession or ownership. Or whose shoes ? whose refers to possession, while who’s is a contraction that means who is or who has

Therefore, we need a possessive pronoun like whose instead of a contraction like who is The correct answer is “ who’s.. In other words, for the word “it” or the word “who”, if you intend to append and contract the word “is”, then you must use an apostrophe, otherwise it would not be a contraction.. If so, then the contraction who’s is the correct word.. The easiest way to know if you’re using the correct word is to replace the word with who is / who has / who was May 7, 2015 at 3:36 pm.. You can check that whose is the correct answer by replacing the word with the phrase who is " below are some examples of who's in sentences.. It’s a contraction, not a possessive word However, who’s breaks this rule.. In english grammar, who’s (with the apostrophe ‘s’) is the contraction for who is , not the possessive pronoun whose (without the apostrophe ‘s’).. Underwood grammar who’s is a contraction linking the words who is or who has , and whose is the possessive form of who.. Other examples of contractions, or shortened words made by combining multiple words, include don’t ( do not ), can’t ( can not ), you’ve ( you have ), and i’ll ( i will ).. whose definition: (pronoun) a question word used to determine which entity is responsible for an item who’s definition: (contraction) who is ; who was ; who has You can read more articles in the archive.. Since whose is a possessive pronoun, it makes more sense than who’s , which is the contraction for the phrases who is and who has The answer is whose Effect by riley thompson manning two of the easiest words in the english language to mix up, learn the difference between affect and effect, when each should be used and more.. The word whose is the possessive form of the pronoun who.. A contraction of who is A contraction of whose Because the phrase is about the person who owns or possesses the phone, we need a possessive pronoun.. Since this is a question about possession, we know that the possessive pronoun whose is correct.. Because whose is a possessive pronoun while who’s is a contraction of the phrases who is and who has whose grammar got a boost from this read?

Modifiers, as their name implies, are words that modify. Specifically, they’re words that modify their sentences’ meanings. How…

Modifiers, as their name implies, are words that modify.. As we mentioned above, modifiers are words that modify their sentences’ meanings.. The second sentence contains both a modifier and a modifier phrase.. While a modifier is a single word that alters a sentence’s meaning, a modifier phrase is a phrase that functions as a modifier.. This is similar to how adjective phrases are phrases that function as adjectives, noun phrases are phrases that function as nouns, and other grammatical phrases function as specific parts of speech .. A dangling modifier is a modifier that doesn’t modify any specific word in the sentence.. That’s because their modifiers aren’t actually modifying any nouns.. You might hear or read that adjective phrases describe adjectives, and this is true in a pedantic sense—an adjective phrase does replace a single adjective by describing what that single adjective would communicate.. Limiting modifiers are modifiers that add detail by describing the limits a noun, pronoun, or other subject in a sentence faces.. Modifiers work by adding descriptive language to sentences, either just before or just after the words they are modifying.. Adjective phrases Adjective clauses Adjectives Adverbs Adverbial phrases Adverbial clauses Limiting modifiers Misplaced modifiers Prepositional phrases

Expert Answers: Who's is a contraction, meaning it's two words stuck together. The formula: who + is, or who + has. For example: who's hungry? Whose is a possessive pronoun.

34 related questions found Who's is a contraction linking the words who is or who has , and whose is the possessive form of who.. Because the phrase is about the person who owns or possesses the phone , we need a possessive pronoun.. The word "whose" is the possessive of "who.". The word "who's" is the contraction of " who is .". The word who's is a contraction of 'who is' .. Whose is a single word that sounds just like it, but is the possessive form of 'who', referring to something belonging to someone.. ... 'Whose' is a possessive pronoun like 'his', and 'our'.. People tend to believe any word with a contraction, such as "who's," is a possessive form.. In fact, "whose" is the possessive form, while "who's" is a contraction for "who is" or "who has.". Whose – Possessive pronoun.. Whose is a possessive pronoun .. Whose is the possessive form of " who .". Whose is the possessive form of the pronoun who, while who's is a contraction of the words who is or who has.. However, many people still find whose and who's particularly confusing because, in English, an apostrophe followed by an s usually indicates the possessive form of a word.. "Whose" is the possessive form of "who".

When to use whom vs. who? If you can swap for 'she' or 'he,' use who. If you can swap for 'her' or 'him,' use whom. Get who vs. whom tips and examples here.

The rule is that who refers to the subject of the sentence while whom refers to object of the verb and or the preposition .. Since whom refers to the object of a verb, it’s the correct pronoun to use in this sentence.. If the sentence is still correct, then you confirm that whom is the correct pronoun.. We know that whom is correct because this pronoun refers to the object of a preposition or verb.. Since who refers to the subject while whom refers to the object of the verb, whom is correct.. Since whom refers to the object of the verb and not the subject, we know that whom is the correct pronoun.

The word 'reflexive' indicates that an action is 'reflected' back to the subject in a sentence. That is to say; the subject is both the doer and recipient of

Reflexive pronouns and verbs indicate that the subject is acting upon itself.. Reflexive pronouns are used to indicate that the subject and object in a sentence are the same.. The subject and object of the second sentence above are the same so ‘herself’ is a reflexive pronoun.. In the first sentence, the subject ‘my father’ performs the action ‘taught’ on the direct object ‘me.’ In the second sentence, the subject ‘I’ performs the action ‘taught’ on ‘myself.’. Myself in the second sentence is a reflexive pronoun because the subject and the object are the same.. Reflexive verbs are any verb form whose direct object is a reflexive pronoun.. If the subject and direct object in a sentence are the same, the verb being performed is reflexive .. Reflexive pronouns can be considered the following: If the object and the subject of a verb are the same, use the object’s reflexive pronomin.. If the verb ends, you can identify reflexive verbs with the reflexive pronoun “se” at the end of the verb (For example: Conocerse – to know each other).. In a transitive verb, the subject and object always refer to the same person or thing, so the object is always a reflexive pronoun.. If a sentence subject performs an action on itself, then the verb is considered reflexive, and the pronoun used to receive the action is reflexive.

Use a comma before which when it introduces a nonrestrictive clause. Learn when to use a comma before or after 'which' and other which comma rules here.

Place a comma before which when which precedes a nonrestrictive clause.. We use which with nonrestrictive clauses, while we use that with restrictive clauses .. Removing a restrictive clause from a sentence changes the sentence’s meaning.. A nonrestrictive modifying clause is a phrase that adds nonessential information to a sentence without altering its meaning.. Always use a comma before which when “which” precedes a nonrestrictive or non-essential clause.. Restrictive Clauses To simplify, restrictive clauses provide essential descriptive information about the noun they modify.. Nonrestrictive Clauses As discussed earlier, nonrestrictive clauses add non-essential information to a sentence.. Unlike a restrictive clause, a nonrestrictive clause doesn’t alter the main meaning of the sentence.. Use a comma before "which" only when it precedes a nonrestrictive clause.. You should use a comma before “which” when it precedes a nonrestrictive clause.. "That" is used with restrictive clauses, while "which" is used with nonrestrictive clauses.

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