Book Summary: For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway (2022) (2022)

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Table of Contents

What is For Whom the Bell Tolls About?

Ernest Hemingway travelled to Spain in 1937 to cover the Spanish Civil War for the North American Newspaper Alliance. Three years later, he completed the greatest novel to come out of “the good fight”, For Whom the Bell Tolls.

It tells of loyalty and courage, love and defeat, and the tragic death of an ideal told through the story of Robert Jordan, a young American in the International Brigades attached to an antifascist guerilla in the mountains of Spain.

In portraying Jordan’s love for the beautiful Maria, and in his superb account of El Sordo’s last stand, and in refusing to believe in blind faith, Hemingway surpasses his achievements in The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms to create a work that is rare and beautiful, strong and brutal, compassionate, moving, and wise.

One of our favourite quotes from For Whom the Bell Tolls is:

“I loved you when I saw you today and I loved you always but I never saw you before.”

Who is The Author of For Whom the Bell Tolls?

Ernest Hemingway (1899–1961) was born in Oak Park, Illinois; died by suicide. He was wounded in World War I serving as an ambulance driver with the Red Cross in Italy; decorated for bravery.

Ernest Hemingway lived in Paris during the 1920s; Key West in the 1930s; Cuba in 1940–59. Went to Spain in 1937 to report on the Republican side of the Spanish Civil War (1936–39) for a newspaper syndicate.

He married four times; three sons. Enjoyed life as a man of action; refused to behave like a “man of letters.” Other major works: The Sun Also Rises (1926), To Have and Have Not (1937), For Whom the Bell Tolls (1940), The Old Man and the Sea (1952). Works published after his death: A Moveable Feast (1964), Islands in the Stream (1970), The Dangerous Summer (1985), The Garden of Eden (1986). Awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in 1954.

(Video) For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway | Book Summary | Audiobook Academy

For Whom the Bell Tolls Book Summary

A young American professor who works as a dynamiter in the Spanish Civil War learns about love and brotherhood while spending the last 70 hours of his life preparing for the explosion of a key bridge behind Fascist lines.

CHAPTERS 1–7 (DAY 1, SATURDAY)

Robert Jordan, an American professor of Spanish who is fighting on the Republican (Loyalist) side in the Spanish Civil War (1936–39) against General Franco’s Fascist army, slips through Fascist lines to make contact with a band of guerrilla fighters in the Guadarrama mountains northwest of Madrid, Spain.

Jordan is an expert dynamiter who speaks fluent Spanish and has been given orders by his Russian commander, General Golz (stationed in Madrid), to penetrate the Fascist line and destroy a key bridge at the very moment that a planned Republican offensive is to begin.

Destroying the bridge will prevent Fascist reinforcements from reaching the battlefront. Jordan has only three days to organize his mission, and his success depends on the support of the guerrilla band, supposedly loyal to the Republican cause, that awaits his arrival.

En route to the mountains, Jordan recalls some of the events that have made the bombing of the bridge necessary. The Republican faction consists of so many diverse groups (Socialists, Spanish Communists, etc.) that it has been difficult for them to become unified; Franco’s Fascist revolutionaries, however, are well organized. As a result, many of the Republican attacks against Franco have failed. Jordan also recalls the time he worked behind enemy lines and dynamited trains.

He reaches the cave where the guerrillas are temporarily living. (A guerrilla or partisan is a member of a small band of independent fighters that harass the enemy by surprise raids; here they are native Spaniards, not in uniform, who support the Republican cause but who act on their own initiative and do not take orders from the Republican leaders.) Jordan meets Pablo, the leader of the guerrillas, and Pilar, Pablo’s gypsy lover—his mujer (Spanish for “woman”)—whose strong character is an inspiration to the group.

Jordan also meets the beautiful Maria, a 19-year-old refugee who had been raped and emotionally assaulted by the Fascists earlier in the war and whom the partisans have sheltered. Jordan and Maria are instantly attracted to each other.

Pablo was once an energetic and courageous fighter. It was he who blew up a train and led the uprising in his village on the first day of the Civil War. But since that time he has lost his nerve and has grown lazy; life has become easy— he has food, wine, and no responsibilities other than to protect his people, and he is more interested in living than in dying for the Republican cause.

For this reason, he resents Jordan, whose mission he fears will endanger the partisans’ safety by bringing enemy troops into the mountains. The partisans have remained loyal to Pablo because he has been their leader for a long time and because no one has challenged him.

But they do not trust him anymore, since he no longer acts bravely. They wish to continue fighting for their country and are prepared to help Jordan, even though there is tension between him and their leader.

Jordan realizes that he may have to kill Pablo in order to carry out his mission successfully. He and Anselmo, an old, reliable partisan, observe the bridge and discuss the problem of wartime killing.

Three questions preoccupy them: What is man’s duty during a war? Is killing morally wrong? Should a soldier take pleasure in killing? Jordan, a man of duty, considers his mission to blow up the bridge of such importance that “the future of the human race” may depend on it.

(Video) For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway | Characters, Summary, Analysis

That night in the cave, Pablo provokes Jordan into an argument, and Jordan nearly kills him. Later, when Jordan is in his sleeping bag, he is startled—but also sexually aroused—when Maria slips in beside him and makes love with him.

The worldly Pilar has sent Maria to Jordan, sensing that Jordan’s love might soothe Maria’s emotional wounds and make her forget about being raped. Pilar has done this, however, with reluctance, since she, too, has sexual feelings for Maria. But Pilar has read Jordan’s palm and believes that he has only a short while to live.

CHAPTERS 8–20 (DAY 2, SUNDAY)

As morning dawns, three enemy patrol planes pass overhead, and it is clear that the mountain cave is vulnerable to attack. During the day, Jordan gathers intelligence about the bridge’s defenses, and enlists Anselmo to count the military traffic crossing it to see if the number of enemy troops is increasing before the attack.

Rumors overheard in a nearby town indicate that the Republicans’ plans may be known to the Fascists. Jordan worries that his mission may be useless, but reassures himself that his only duty is to destroy the bridge. While carefully planning the operation and the escape that will follow, he realizes that he does not have enough men to overpower the guards or enough horses to ensure a hasty retreat.

To obtain more support, Jordan walks with Pilar and Maria to the nearby mountain camp of El Sordo, the leader of another partisan band. En route, Pilar recollects the first day of the Civil War in her village, when Pablo beat the town Fascists to death with flails and threw them over a cliff. Some of the men faced their deaths without fear; others begged for mercy and died in terror.

Jordan then recalls the death of his former partner, with whom he had dynamited trains behind enemy lines. Wounded to the point where he could go no farther, the man had asked Jordan to kill him rather than leave him for the Fascists to torture.

Jordan shot him out of compassion, and still carries the same pistol. At El Sordo’s camp, Jordan receives a promise of men and horses from the old partisan, who, unlike Pablo, has remained active in the war. Pilar sets out ahead of the other two, leaving Jordan and Maria to return to the cave alone. They make love in a field of heather, and feel “the earth move out and away from under them.”

In a series of flashbacks and interior monologues (i.e., moments when thoughts flash randomly through Jordan’s mind), Jordan evaluates his political position: he loves Spain and is fighting against fascism, but is on the Socialist/Communist side.

Though he is not a Communist, he sees the dissension and conflicts within the Republican faction, and knows that the discipline of the Russian Communists is essential to a Republican victory. He knows that his life may end in 70 hours, so he devotes himself completely to his work and to his new lover.

As wet snow falls that night, a cold but dutiful Anselmo times the movements of the guards on the bridge road and monitors the increase in military traffic. El Sordo and his men, thinking that the snow will provide them with cover, leave their hideout to steal the needed horses.

In the cave, Jordan and Pablo nearly have a violent showdown, but Pablo sidesteps it at the last moment. The snow stops abruptly as Sunday night ends, and Maria joins Jordan for their second night together in his sleeping bag.

CHAPTERS 21–32 (DAY 3, MONDAY)

Jordan, sleeping outside the cave, wakes to find a Fascist horseman almost on top of him. Jordan shoots and kills the man, and Pablo leads his horse away, covering the tracks left in the snow so as to mislead the inevitable Fascist search party.

Now that the snow has stopped, El Sordo is left hopelessly exposed; he had counted on the snow continuing through the day so that his tracks would be covered, but they are visible, and he is now being pursued by the Fascist cavalry.

Trapped on a lonely hilltop, he and his men defend themselves bravely against the foot soldiers. Knowing that he is about to die, El Sordo jokes about the voyage into death—a voyage on which he will take as many of the enemy as possible. But courage is not enough; Fascist dive-bombers blow El Sordo and his men to death (“the earth rolled under him with a roar”).

The only survivor, a boy named Joaquín, is executed by the Fascist Lieutenant Berrendo. El Sordo’s death and the loss of his men and his horses leave Jordan without enough fighters to ensure the attack on the bridge and with no way to get all the partisans out afterward.

Furthermore, Anselmo’s count of military traffic across the bridge indicates that the Republican attack is well anticipated by the enemy; already they have begun moving reinforcements to the same front that the Republican army will attack. Jordan, who does not want to die unnecessarily at the bridge, sends a written message back to Golz, advising him to call off the attack.

As night falls, Maria joins Jordan once again. They dream of the life they will have in Madrid after the bridge, after the war. Maria, whom Jordan calls “Rabbit,” tells of her rape by the Fascists, and Jordan drifts off to sleep, knowing that he may die in the morning.

CHAPTERS 33–43 (DAY 4, TUESDAY)

The last day of Jordan’s mission begins with yet another disaster. Pilar wakes him at 3:30 A.M. to say that Pablo has left with Jordan’s detonator and blasting caps. They are now unable to explode the dynamite.

The events that follow alternate between the carrying of Jordan’s warning to Golz by the frustrated messenger and the partisans’ preparation to attack the bridge. Jordan realizes that if the message arrives in time, Golz can abort the mission. Understaffed, without his detonator, and certain that the impending attack will fail, Jordan is left only with his duty.

Though the good soldier will carry out his orders, the attack looks more and more like a suicide mission. Meanwhile, on the Loyalist side of the line, Jordan’s message has become bogged down in petty bureaucratic red tape; since there are so many spies on both sides, every message must be examined carefully, and the messenger is not allowed to speak directly to Golz.

By the time the message makes its way through the chain of command, it arrives too late for Golz to cancel the attack.

Jordan’s chances of destroying the bridge improve slightly when Pablo unexpectedly returns. He had thrown the detonator away, hoping to stop the suicide mission, but now his “weakness” has passed. He returns with five more men and horses to assist in the attack. In the meantime, Jordan has devised a way to explode the dynamite by packing it tightly around hand grenades with long pull-wires as detonators.

The moment to launch the attack arrives. Pablo bravely prevents an enemy tank from advancing while Jordan coolly plants his dynamite under the steel span. The bridge blows, but old Anselmo, who pulls one of the wires, is killed by the explosion.

Pablo murders his new recruits so there will be enough horses for his own people. But before Jordan can begin the evacuation, Fascist troops with mobile artillery begin shelling the guerrillas. In the escape across exposed terrain, everyone makes it to safety except Jordan, who is blown off his horse.

The horse is killed, and Jordan suffers a broken leg. He quickly assesses the situation and orders the partisans to leave him behind, shouting to them that he will be the rear guard and will lay down his life to ensure their safe escape.

In the last 70 hours of his life, Robert Jordan has lived more intensely than most people do in a lifetime. He has loved deeply, performed his duty under extraordinary circumstances, joined in brotherhood with the partisans, and now faces his own death.

Though he is in great pain, Jordan concentrates on dying with courage. While preparing himself for the advancing Fascist patrol, he thinks about his father, who committed suicide, and his grandfather, who fought bravely in the American Civil War—two very different models of behavior.

(Video) For whom the bell tolls Ernest Hemingway | for whom the bell tolls summary in English #war_novel

As the pain increases, Jordan considers suicide, but fights the temptation since he wishes to die a brave soldier’s death. Lying flat on the ground, he readies his gun and waits as the approaching Fascist comes closer; it is Lieutenant Berrendo, who had executed the boy on El Sordo’s hilltop.

Further Reading

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FAQs

What is the summary of For Whom the Bell Tolls by Hemingway? ›

For Whom the Bell Tolls is a novel by Ernest Hemingway published in 1940. It tells the story of Robert Jordan, a young American volunteer attached to a Republican guerrilla unit during the Spanish Civil War. As a dynamiter, he is assigned to blow up a bridge during an attack on the city of Segovia.

What is the moral of For Whom the Bell Tolls? ›

By Ernest Hemingway

Many of the characters in For Whom the Bell Tolls find their moral beliefs troubled by the war in which they're fighting. Winning a war requires the use of violence to defeat or eliminate one's enemies; that much everyone agrees. But even if violence is necessary, it's not clear that makes it right.

Is For Whom the Bell Tolls a good book? ›

"For Whom the Bell Tolls" is a tremendous piece of work. It is the most moving document to date on the Spanish Civil War, and the first major novel of the Second World War. As a story, it is superb, packed with the matter of picaresque romance: blood, lust, adventure, vulgarity, comedy, tragedy.

What battle is For Whom the Bell Tolls about? ›

Gary Cooper and Ingrid Bergman in For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943). Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. Young American idealist schoolteacher Robert Jordan (played by Gary Cooper) joins the Republican brigade in Spain, battling fascist Nationalist armies during the Spanish Civil War (1936–39) and serving as a dynamiter.

What does this mean and therefore never send to know For Whom the Bell Tolls it tolls for thee? ›

It means something like "Don`t ask for whom the funeral bell tolls (i.e. who died) because it also tolls for you." (i.e. you are a part of the mankind, so when one dies, you also die a little).

What does it mean when a bell tolls? ›

When a bell tolls or when someone tolls it, it rings slowly and repeatedly, often as a sign that someone has died.

Why did Hemingway write for whom the bell tolls? ›

In 1936 and 1937, Hemingway wrote and made speeches for the purpose of raising money for the Loyalist cause in the Spanish Civil War.

Is For Whom the Bell Tolls difficult to read? ›

A well-loved classic, I found the novel a bit too jarring for my taste. Whereas Heller's Catch-22 had a more complacent tone, Hemingway's For Whom the Bell Tolls had a bleaker one. Contrary to my expectations, I had an overwhelmingly difficult reading experience due to a number of reasons enumerated in this review.

What reading level is For Whom the Bell Tolls? ›

For Whom the Bell Tolls
Interest LevelReading LevelATOS
Grades 9 - 12Grades 4 - 95.8
Jun 15, 2017

What does no man is an island mean? ›

No one is self-sufficient; everyone relies on others. This saying comes from a sermon by the seventeenth-century English author John Donne.

What does 7 bells mean? ›

The meaning of 7 Bells

This method of marking time spread by communal usage because all seafarers share citizenship in a single nation: the sea. The eighth bell sounds the end of the last watchman shift. Seven bells is right before “the end”. In sailor-speak, “8 bells” is the euphemism for death.

How long does it take to read For Whom the Bell Tolls? ›

The average reader will spend 11 hours and 36 minutes reading this book at 250 WPM (words per minute).

For Whom the Bell Tolls shmoop summary? ›

Set in the mountains of Spain in 1937, it tells the story of Robert Jordan, an American fighting for the Republicans (that's one side of the Spanish Civil War, not the American political party) who is ordered to blow up a bridge as part of a larger offensive.

Who are the characters in For Whom the Bell Tolls? ›

For Whom the Bell Tolls

What is the historical context of For Whom the Bell Tolls? ›

For Whom the Bell Tolls (1940) takes place during the Spanish Civil War, which ravaged the country throughout the late 1930s. Tensions in Spain began to rise as early as 1931, when a group of left-wing Republicans overthrew the country's monarchy in a bloodless coup.

What happens in For Whom the Bell Tolls Chapter 1? ›

Summary: Chapter One

Anselmo is guiding Robert Jordan behind enemy lines to join a small band of guerrilla fighters near the bridge that Robert Jordan has been instructed to blow up.

How old is Maria in For Whom the Bell Tolls? ›

Bravery is, undoubtedly, a feature one cannot deny Maria. Being only nineteen years old, she has witnessed her parents' execution, has been held prisoner, repeatedly raped by the fascists, and, finally, lost the man she loved.

For Whom the Bell Tolls relationship between Jordan and Maria? ›

As Robert Jordan's love interest, Maria provides the impetus for his personal development from an unfeeling thinker and doer to a romantic individual. In his conversations with General Golz and with Maria early in the novel, Robert Jordan reveals his belief that he does not have time for women during the war.

Who is Pablo in For Whom the Bell Tolls? ›

Pablo is the leader of the band of guerillas who are supposed to aid Jordan in the demolition of the bridge, the central action of the book. When the reader first encounters Pablo, he finds the man to be sullen and uncooperative, wanting neither himself nor his men to have any part in Jordan's assignment.

Why did Hemingway write for whom the bell tolls? ›

In 1936 and 1937, Hemingway wrote and made speeches for the purpose of raising money for the Loyalist cause in the Spanish Civil War.

A short summary of Ernest Hemingway's For Whom The Bell Tolls This free synopsis covers all the crucial plot points of For Whom The Bell Tolls.

Along the way, they encounter Pablo,. the leader of the camp, who greets Robert Jordan with hostility. and opposes the bridge operation because he believes it endangers. the guerrilleros’ safety.. At the camp, Robert Jordan meets Pilar, Pablo’s “woman.”. A large, sturdy part-gypsy, Pilar appears to be the real leader. of the band of guerrilleros.. Privately,. Rafael urges Robert Jordan to kill Pablo, but Pilar insists that. Pablo is not dangerous.. The next morning, Pilar leads Robert Jordan through the. forest to consult with El Sordo, the leader of another band of guerrilleros, about. the bridge operation.. On the way back to Pablo’s camp, Robert. Jordan and Maria make love in the forest.. Back at the camp, a drunken Pablo insults Robert Jordan,. who tries to provoke Pablo, hoping to find an excuse to kill him.. At two in the morning, Pilar wakes Robert Jordan and reports that. Pablo has fled the camp with some of the explosives that were meant. to blow the bridge.. As the group crosses the road in retreat, a Fascist bullet. hits Robert Jordan’s horse, which tramples on Robert Jordan’s left. leg, breaking it.

For Whom the Bell Tolls was written by Ernest Hemingway. The story is about a young man, Robert Jordan. He was assigned to compete for a mission to blow up...

The Spanish Civil War was a battle between democracy and fascism.. After inspecting the bridge, the two return to camp where they meet another of Pablo's group, Augustin.. But, they must be especially careful because they are supposed to blow up the bridge during the day on Tuesday morning right after the Republican's begin their aerial bombing attack.. On the way back to their camp, Pilar goes on ahead so Robert and Maria can have some time alone.. Robert and his group leave their horses near where they are to blow up the bridge.. Then Robert, Anselmo, and Augustin separate from the rest of the squad and head toward the bridge they are planning on blowing up.

Are you looking for a book summary of For Whom the Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway? You have come to the right place.I jotted down a few key insights from Ernest Hemingway’s book after reading it.You do not have to read the entire book if you don’t have time. This book summary provides an overview o...

A young American professor who works as a dynamiter in the Spanish Civil War learns about love and brotherhood while spending the last 70 hours of his life preparing for the explosion of a key bridge behind Fascist lines.. Robert Jordan, an American professor of Spanish who is fighting on the Republican (Loyalist) side in the Spanish Civil War (1936–39) against General Franco’s Fascist army, slips through Fascist lines to make contact with a band of guerrilla fighters in the Guadarrama mountains northwest of Madrid, Spain.. Jordan is an expert dynamiter who speaks fluent Spanish and has been given orders by his Russian commander, General Golz (stationed in Madrid), to penetrate the Fascist line and destroy a key bridge at the very moment that a planned Republican offensive is to begin.. The worldly Pilar has sent Maria to Jordan, sensing that Jordan’s love might soothe Maria’s emotional wounds and make her forget about being raped.. But courage is not enough; Fascist dive-bombers blow El Sordo and his men to death (“the earth rolled under him with a roar”).. El Sordo’s death and the loss of his men and his horses leave Jordan without enough fighters to ensure the attack on the bridge and with no way to get all the partisans out afterward.

For Whom the Bell Tolls, published in 1940, grew out of Hemingway's personal interest in the Spanish Civil War of the thirties. While still a foreign correspond

While still a foreign correspondent in Paris, Hemingway had watched the Spanish political situation developing under the reign of Alfonso XIII.. Many young men from the United States and other countries joined the Spanish Loyalist forces in defense of democratic ideals in a war that was won by the dictator, Francisco Franco.. Since that war has tended to slip into the dimness of the shadow cast by World War II, the following review of historical and biographical background should clarify a number of things pertinent to the novel.. The Communist-Socialist coalition which ruled Spain during the first two years of the republic was, like its predecessors, plagued by strikes, and a general election was called for November 1933.. In this election, the rightists were returned to power with a large majority.. The Conservatives were, however, only able to keep themselves in power for about the same length of time that the leftists had.. International politics played a great part in the civil war during the next two years, giving the advantage first to one side and then to the other.. Resistance in towns and cities which had managed so far to hold out against Franco's troops began to collapse.. Finally, on March 28, 1939, the well supplied Monarchist forces overcame the resistance of the besieged city of Madrid.. He traveled extensively in Spain and was vitally interested in the political developments during the reign of Alfonso XIII, from 1923 until 1931.. When the Conservatives were returned to power in 1933, Hemingway was traveling in Africa.. When the civil war finally began in 1936, the only surprising thing to him was that it had come so soon, for as early as the summer of 1935, he had predicted that war would come before the end of the decade.

FreeBookSummary.com ✅ When many think of wars, the first thought that comes to mind is the land which was fought over and which side won. They never consider...

In For Whom the Bell Tolls, Hemingway captivates the realism of war through his own eyes.. Drawing from his own observation and experiences as an ambulance driver, Hemingway shows the psychological damage of war through the destruction of human lives, uncommitted relationships, and lack of confidence.. These themes can be directly drawn from Hemingway’s own “first hand of experience of violence” (Reynolds 23) in every major war in his lifetime as an ambulance driver and journalist.. Being that Hemingway had been to every significant war in between World War I and World War , Hemingway was no stranger to the cruelty of war and for this reason there is a strong influence of his own personal experiences with war.. Although Robert Jordan was not sheltered from the loss of human lives, Hemingway focuses mostly on the characters that were born and raised in Spain because they had been exposed to the reality of war much longer than foreign soldiers had.. While Robert confesses that he would never” kill a proprietor of any kind” (Hemingway 46) Anselmo questions whether all “killing is a sin” (Baker 83) no matter the justification.. Without his knowledge of war, Hemingway would have never lived up to the realness of For Whom the Bell Tolls.. Drawing from his own observation and experiences as Guerra 5 an ambulance driver, Hemingway shows the psychological damage of war through

“There's no one thing that's true. It's all true.”― Ernest Hemingway, quote from For Whom the Bell Tolls“There is nothing else than now. There is neither yesterday, certainly, nor is there any tomorrow. How old must you be before you know that? There is only now, and if now is only two days, then t...

It's all true.”― Ernest Hemingway, quote from For Whom the Bell Tolls. A good life is not measured by any biblical span.”― Ernest Hemingway, quote from For Whom the Bell Tolls. “I loved you when I saw you today and I loved you always but I never saw you before.”― Ernest Hemingway, quote from For Whom the Bell Tolls. I wish there was more time.”― Ernest Hemingway, quote from For Whom the Bell Tolls. The cat is the best anarchist.”― Ernest Hemingway, quote from For Whom the Bell Tolls. But I tell you it is true and that you have it and that you are lucky even if you die tomorrow.”― Ernest Hemingway, quote from For Whom the Bell Tolls. But I tell you it is true and that you have it and that you are lucky even if you die tomorrow.”― Ernest Hemingway, quote from For Whom the Bell Tolls. “For him it was a dark passage which led to nowhere, then to nowhere, then again to nowhere, once again to nowhere, always and forever to nowhere, heavy on the elbows in the earth to nowhere, dark, never any end to nowhere, hung on all time always to unknowing nowhere, this time and again for always to nowhere, now not to be borne once again always and to nowhere, now beyond all bearing up, up, up and into nowhere, suddenly, scaldingly, holdingly all nowhere gone and time absolutely still and they were both there, time having stopped and he felt the earth move out and away from under them.”― Ernest Hemingway, quote from For Whom the Bell Tolls. “I love thee and thou art so lovely and so wonderful and so beautiful and it does such things to me to be with thee that I feel as though I wanted to die when I am loving thee.”― Ernest Hemingway, quote from For Whom the Bell Tolls. It is very rare.”― Ernest Hemingway, quote from For Whom the Bell Tolls. “But in the meantime all the life you have or ever will have is today, tonight, tomorrow, today, tonight, tomorrow, over and over again (I hope), ...”― Ernest Hemingway, quote from For Whom the Bell Tolls. “I am an old man who will live until I die," Anselmo said.”― Ernest Hemingway, quote from For Whom the Bell Tolls. “I suppose if a man has something once, always something of it remains.”― Ernest Hemingway, quote from For Whom the Bell Tolls. A good life is not measured by any biblical span.”― Ernest Hemingway, quote from For Whom the Bell Tolls

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Introduction: My name is Virgilio Hermann JD, I am a fine, gifted, beautiful, encouraging, kind, talented, zealous person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.